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Wed, 3rd December 2014
 

I live on a busy highway, once a tranquil two lane street that started and went nowhere. Now ten lanes carry more than 100,000 vehicles screeching past every day.

In quieter times there was a zebra crossing outside. My two children coming home from school one day were hit by a car in the "safety zone". It happened to be a patient trying to locate my surgery. They sustained broken legs, injured backs but survived. As a result a local petition asked for a bridge crossing. Twenty years later this eventuated. The zebra was eliminated and fences erected to prevent people wandering onto the road. What happens now?

New Bridge

The bridge is used less than a dozen times a day. Locals stand at gutter edge, wait till cars stop one way (due to traffic lights) then leisurely cross to the first narrow median strip. Then onto the second. Finally to the third, and ultimately to the opposite side. I look on in amazement every day to witness the recurring scene. At present a new high-rise is going up across the road. Which means legions of workmen park on "our side" and in throngs try and cross the road. They are local strangers, but do they use the bridge? Never, never. Not knowing the red light system a km on either side, they literally barge in front of fast moving cars, trucks and semis.

Good Luck

It is just good luck many have not been struck or killed. I still gasp every day in wonderment. If somebody was hit, of course, it would be "the motorists fault"! We humans are crazy, ignoring what has been set up by government bodies to protect us. Do we like the thrill of escaping death? Is there an undercurrent adrenaline rush each time a speeding vehicle brushes within a few cm of the body? Similarly to people wandering along roads, median strips (terribly dangerous places), not looking where they are stepping on footpaths (often tripping and risking broken bones). It is probably all part of the human lottery of life, the instinctive belief of invulnerability. Please be careful and use what protective strategies are available. We could all live longer.

 
TINGLY FEET

Q: 

I am a mild diabetic and notice my feet are often tingly.

A: 

This is early diabetic neuropathy. High blood sugar levels gradually adversely affect nerve end organs in the skin. Sugar control is essential, for this will inevitably worsen. It will also negatively impact all other organs, foot circulation, vision, kidneys, brain, heart and clogged blood vessels. A regular blood sugar evaluation is recommended for everybody. Diabetes (and obesity) is the worst health issue facing Australia.

 
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BIRD FLU

Q: 

Can bird flu virus jump from person to person?

A: 

We do not know, although it is thought not. We do not know how it jumped from poultry to humans, but it certainly does. Probably the same way in which HIV jumped species from chimps to humans. However, once in the human chain, just like the 1918 pandemic, it could go mad and affect and kill tens of millions. Many believe it is simply a matter of time before a world pandemic of gigantic proportions occurs. Wait for the movie - that will probably come first.

 
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SEX

Q: 

I have been advised to undergo surgery on the prostate as it is grossly enlarged, but I hear that it kills sex stone dead.

A: 

You're right. It kills sex stone stone dead, even though doctors try and convince you otherwise. The special sex nerves are invariably ripped out, despite valiant efforts to preserve them. The surgeon is digging around in the dark with blood and bits of prostate gushing out. Not a pretty sight. However, time will catch up. If you cannot pass urine, ultimately, there will be no choice, and the lusts and delights of the flesh will be forced to take a secondary position. Time marches on.

 
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THE RUBBISH TIP

Q: 

My dad likes all his "stuff" around him, even though his home office looks as though a whirlwind has passed through it. I tell him to clean it up, but he says its comfy, and he knows where everything is.

A: 

There is certainly something comforting about reality and "non change". Seniors often prefer the worn carpets, old soft cushions, dents in the mattress where they have slept for decades, the same old crockery (with a few cracks and chips), so why change. A sudden change to unfamiliar brand new things is not what they want. Let them enjoy their happy surroundings and "stuff".

 
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OFFAL

Q: 

What is meant by offal, and should we eat it?

A: 

Hang up an animal carcass, and let all the loose bits come away. That equals offal. The rest is bone, fat and muscle. Offal often has a high food value, such as kidneys, liver, brain, gut. Most enjoy it when cooked, others do not. Take your pick. However, when eating a meal, few considered its source. The same goes for vegetarians, for really their veggies were grown in dirt once heavily fertilised with animal manure or crushed up blood and bone.

 
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This health advice is general in nature. You are advised to seek medical attention from your doctor or health care provider for your own specific symptoms and circumstances.

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